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15 July 2014

Inside BIGSS 2014, Part 2: Where knowledge and fun shook hands

Editor’s note: Guest blogger Khushi Vyas, Outreach Coordinator for the SPIE Student Chapter at Imperial College London, was among students at the biophotonics and imaging graduate summer school 15-20 June at the National Biophotonics Imaging Platform Ireland (NBIPI), National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway. In the second of two posts, Khushi describes the experience of attending the school from a personal perspective.

Wisely -- and happily -- BIGSS organizers ensure that the week is not all work and
no play; above attendees get to know each other better over refreshments after hours.
Galway -- the cultural city of Ireland with Bohemian accents -- played host to the fifth annual Biophotonics and Imaging Summer School (BIGSS), organized by the NUI Galway Applied Optics group and chaired by Professor Martin Leahy, who also leads the NBIPI. A mixed crowd, from first-timers to all-timers, comprised this year’s approximately 50 students who not only attended the technical program but made the school an experience of a lifetime.

Practical workshops, poster sessions, and discussion groups on hot topics in the field of photonics and imaging encouraged us students to engage with and explore our potential.

The welcome reception broke the ice among the participants and got everyone talking, divulging enthusiasms and work interests. Young scientists as well as early-career professionals working in multidisciplinary biophotonics areas came to a common platform from which to understand each others’ research work and future interests.

Throughout the rest of the week, eminent guest speakers from all over the world lectured on trending topics such as fluorescence life-time imaging, photoacoustic imaging, optogenetics, optical coherence tomography, and superresolution microscopy. Each speaker not only covered the fundamentals and applications of the topic, but also talked about their contributions in the area and dedicated a good amount of time to discussions which proved quite useful.

Lectures were complemented by practical workshop sessions in which Professor Leahy and his research group did an excellent job in demonstrating the working and applications of these modalities for in vitro and in vivo imaging.

Practical formats such as the poster session which were integrated into the program helped us realize our potential and encouraged discussions and inspirations based on other’s work. Interactive sessions with guest speakers prompted new ideas and future directions for research work. Lectures and sessions highlighted the importance of developing simple, affordable and accessible imaging techniques that could be translated seamlessly into clinical workflow.

However well-integrated a program is, all work and no play ain’t a very good idea.

Galway from the water: participants enjoy a
cruise on the River Corrib.
Activities including a river cruise, barbeque night, and a gala dinner at Dunguaire Castle made us acquainted beyond our professional lives and aspirations. Networking and bonding got more fuel in relaxed environments, and the city’s charm fostered the budding friendships among attendees.

By the end of the program, our knowledge quotient in the field of biophotonics was raised a notch, thanks to experts in the field. Present and future trends in biophotonics surfaced along with our insight into the field.

In early stages of research life, such experiences contribute invaluably towards a future and motivate one to work towards finding solutions for unmet clinical needs. Along with a renewed energy and streamlined direction for further research, we take home memories, new friendships, and hopes of meeting soon, which are at the heart of such experiences.

Inside BIGSS 2014, Part 1: Hot topics, trends, and the future of biophotonics

Editor’s note: Guest blogger Khushi Vyas, Outreach Coordinator for the SPIE Student Chapter at Imperial College London, was among students at the biophotonics and imaging graduate summer school 15-20 June at the National Biophotonics Imaging Platform Ireland (NBIPI), National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway. The first of two posts filed by Khushi describes the topics and trends discussed during the school.

BIGSS participants enjoyed an energizing week in Galway.
The recent fifth annual Biophotonics and Imaging Graduate Summer School (BIGSS) offered a great platform for multidisciplinary learning in biophotonics and fostered communication across several disciplines. Students went home with new ideas, streamlined directions for research, new contacts, and the motivation to contribute towards finding solutions for unmet clinical needs.

Participants included approximately 50 graduate students and early-career professionals and seven distinguished guest speakers working in diverse fields of engineering and imaging physics.

BIGSS chair
Martin Leahy
School organizers invite a different panel each year to share their knowledge, perspectives, and vision on the hot topics and future trends in biophotonics, noted Professor Martin Leahy, the chairperson for BIGSS 2014 and Scientific Director of NBIPI.

Tracks included:
  • Fluorescence microscopy
  • Superresolution microscopy
  • Tissue optics and light-tissue interactions
  • Optogenetics
  • Optical coherence tomography
  • Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging
  • In vivo three-photon microscopy.
Each of the guest speakers covered seminal developments in manifold disciplines of biophotonics and presented a plethora of applications for 3D clinical imaging in vivo.

The trending topics of fluorescence lifetime imaging and multidimensional fluorescence imaging and their many applications towards in vivo and in vitro molecular imaging were discussed by Professor Paul French (Imperial College London).

Professor Rainer Heintzmann (Friedrich-Schiller-Universit├Ąt Jena) updated the audience with technological milestones achieved to advance from conventional microscopic imaging towards super resolution microscopy and highlighted the challenges that still persist in the field.

Professor Steve Jacques (Oregon Health and Sciences University) talked about the compelling research opportunities to assess and monitor nanoarchitecture of cells by developing novel microscope systems and use the information for therapy and diagnosis.

The new and very fast-growing field of optogenetics was discussed by Professor Samar Mohanty (University of Texas, Arlington) who threw light on his contributions towards optogenetic interventions of neural disorders.

Discussions by Professor Johannes de Boer (Vrie Universiteit Amsterdam) and Professor Stanislav Emelianov (University of Texas, Austin) on recent developments in optical coherence tomography and ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging respectively as a clinical imaging tool were also very well received by the attendees.

Professor Chris Xu (Cornell University) concluded the BIGSS guest lecture series by his talk on in vivo three-photon and four-photon microscopy and how this technology could pave the way for breakthroughs in neuroscience and clinical imaging.

When the exciting week drew to an end, participants were polled on potential themes for next year’s BIGSS program, and nanophotonics, photonic therapeutics, and optogenetics shone as popular choices amongst the attendees. Professor Leahy commented on the growing interest in developing ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging reconstruction tomography as a clinical tool, saying that he envisions it to be a much-talked-about topic in the near future.

07 July 2014

Your picture on the cover: SPIE’s International Year of Light Photo Contest

Show us your photonics -- that’s what the SPIE Professional magazine staff are asking of photographers around the world.

Light, water, camera, action: Indirect light in a darkened
aquarium highlights anatomical detail in a tank of
swimming jellyfish. (Nikon D40, Nikon AF-S DX
Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G lens, ISO 1600)
Winning photos showing the use of light and light-based technologies in daily life will win cash prizes and cover placement in an issue of SPIE Professional, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.

The SPIE International Year of Light 2015 Photo Contest is part of the society's observance of the United Nations-declared International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies in 2015 (IYL2015).

IYL2015 is a celebration of the crosscutting discipline of science that has revolutionized medicine, astronomy, and clean energy and opened up international communication via the Internet, and that continues to be central to linking cultural, economic, and political aspects of the global society.

Entries in the SPIE Professional contest must be received by 30 September 2014. Prizes will be awarded in 2015.

Too obvious? Maybe, but this smartphone
is packed with light-based technologies,
not to mention the lasers and other photonics
used to build it. (Nikon D40, Nikon AF-S
DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G lens)
Judges knowledgeable in light-based technologies and photography will award a top prize of US $2,500, a second prize of $1,000, and a third prize of $500.

In addition, members of the optics and photonics community and the general public will vote on winner for a "People's Choice" prize of $500.

Photographers of all ages are eligible to submit a maximum of two photos that show light or a light-based technology used in everyday life. Photos are not required to be scientific but they should hold some scientific interest or communicate the International Year of Light theme.

In addition to scientific interest, judges will also evaluate photos on creativity, artistry, and overall appeal. Minimal digital enhancement will be permitted. Because the top photos will be published on the covers of the print editions of SPIE Professional in 2015 and displayed in large format at SPIE Optics + Photonics in 2015, only print-quality digital files will be considered. Files smaller than 5 MB will not be accepted.

Complete information on the contest and rules is at www.spie.org/IYL.

How do you see light or light-based technologies being used in your daily life? Send in your photos.

Looking for inspiration? Take a tour of the gallery of gorgeous images from space presented by astronomer and science educator Ryan Hannahoe.