Skip to main content

Where's lithography going?

The semiconductor industry has seen some trying times of late, but the energy feels strongly positive today, on the first day of the lithography community’s annual gathering in San Jose. And the perspective is strongly forward-looking, as evidenced by the first two talks at SPIE Advanced Lithography.

The meeting began with all-symposium plenary talks, as it has for most of the 35 years it has been held.

EUV was front-and-center in IMEC CEO Luc Van den hove’s picture of the future; IMEC has invested in ASML’s new NXE3100 pre-production EUV lithography scanner. Van den hove shared his vision of how applications of semiconductor technology will further enhance human capabilities and presented the necessary device roadmap to make that vision a reality.

Luc Van den hove (IMEC)


"We are people of bits and bytes," he said. "Just imagine a day without your smart phone.” That demand, he noted, creates an increasingly large need to lower energy consumption to realize true advances that will help solve the large problems that mankind faces, among them:
  • sensor applications for monitoring air or food quality
  • growing interest in 3D video displays with applications in entertainment, teleconferencing, and medical procedures
  • eco-friendly autonomous cars
  • mating microfluidics and biosensors to enable more preventative, predictive care for a population that will see a doubling in the number of 60+ people by the year 2050.
In the morning’s second plenery talk, Shang-yi Chiang of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Corporation styled Moore's Law for the next decade. Chiang noted that so far optical lithography has been the key to staying aligned with Moore's Law.
Shang-yi Chiang (TSMC)

However, Chiang said, if one looks at a comparison of the costs of producing at lower and lower nodes, one can see that extension of current ArF immersion techniques will become increasingly more costly than EUV or multiple-electron-beam direct write (MEBDW). So, he said, based solely on economics, it's clear that technology migration to next-generation lithography is necessary to sustain Moore's Law.

Conversations throughout the week will move both theory and technology forward. As Chiang noted, when it comes to lithography, the future is in the hands of the attendees of this conference.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

#FacesofPhotonics: Rising Researcher Alina Zare

SPIE's #FacesofPhotonics is sharing the story of Alina Zare, Associate Professor at the The Machine Learning and Sensing Lab at the University of Florida. Dr. Zare was recognized as a 2018 Rising Researcher for her work in Electronic Imaging & Signal Processing, at the SPIE Defense + Commercial Sensing conference.

This program recognizes early career professionals who conduct outstanding research in the defense, commercial, and scientific sensing, imaging, optics, or related fields. If you want to learn more about the program, the details are here.

Enjoy the interview with Alina!

1. Tell us about when you first became interested in optics and photonics. In my senior year of  undergraduate studies in computer science, I was taking an Image Processing elective.  I really enjoyed the course, and the professor for the class, Dr. Gerhard Ritter, encouraged me to do some undergraduate research.  
So I joined Dr. Paul Gader's research lab as a undergraduate researcher where I he…

Lighting Their Way

It's a feast for the science-curious senses: in June, two cohorts of two dozen middle-school girls came together for the free, STEM-focused, four-day-long Physics Wonder Girls Camp sessions organized by Dr. Roberto Ramos, associate professor of physics at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.

The girls studied the properties of light, built telescopes, designed and engineered submersible robots, and learned about scientific professions directly from the experts: nanoscientist and Chair of Bryn Mawr College's Physics Department Dr. Xuemei Cheng; INTEL software engineer Dr. Marisa Bauza-Roman; and several female food scientists from Puratos, a global company working with bakers and chocolatiers to assess the best ways to improve their products, all came and talked about their professions, answering questions and interacting with the campers. Plus, they got to be on TV!

The camp was initially inspired by Dr. Ramos' daughter Kristiana who expressed interest in the s…

#FacesofPhotonics: University of Arizona Cancer Researcher Kelli Kiekens

SPIE’s #FacesofPhotonics is a showcase across social media that connects SPIE members in the optics and photonics community around the world.

It serves to highlight similarities, celebrate differences, and foster a space for conversation and community to thrive.

This week on #FacesofPhotonics we are sharing the story of Kelli Kiekens, researcher at the University of Arizona in Dr. Barton's lab. From searching for a way to detect cancer earlier, to ballroom dancing, Kelli is a woman of many talents.

We hope you enjoy her interview.

1. Tell us about when you first became interested in optics and photonics. During my undergraduate education, my senior design class concentrated on various topics within optics. The group project for that semester was a study of holography where we created different types of holograms using a few different methods. 


We could then compare the quality of the holograms and see which were better. The part of this project that caught my attention is when we …