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Your picture on the cover: SPIE’s International Year of Light Photo Contest

Show us your photonics -- that’s what the SPIE Professional magazine staff are asking of photographers around the world.

Light, water, camera, action: Indirect light in a darkened
aquarium highlights anatomical detail in a tank of
swimming jellyfish. (Nikon D40, Nikon AF-S DX
Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G lens, ISO 1600)
Winning photos showing the use of light and light-based technologies in daily life will win cash prizes and cover placement in an issue of SPIE Professional, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.

The SPIE International Year of Light 2015 Photo Contest is part of the society's observance of the United Nations-declared International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies in 2015 (IYL2015).

IYL2015 is a celebration of the crosscutting discipline of science that has revolutionized medicine, astronomy, and clean energy and opened up international communication via the Internet, and that continues to be central to linking cultural, economic, and political aspects of the global society.

Entries in the SPIE Professional contest must be received by 30 September 2014. Prizes will be awarded in 2015.

Too obvious? Maybe, but this smartphone
is packed with light-based technologies,
not to mention the lasers and other photonics
used to build it. (Nikon D40, Nikon AF-S
DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G lens)
Judges knowledgeable in light-based technologies and photography will award a top prize of US $2,500, a second prize of $1,000, and a third prize of $500.

In addition, members of the optics and photonics community and the general public will vote on winner for a "People's Choice" prize of $500.

Photographers of all ages are eligible to submit a maximum of two photos that show light or a light-based technology used in everyday life. Photos are not required to be scientific but they should hold some scientific interest or communicate the International Year of Light theme.

In addition to scientific interest, judges will also evaluate photos on creativity, artistry, and overall appeal. Minimal digital enhancement will be permitted. Because the top photos will be published on the covers of the print editions of SPIE Professional in 2015 and displayed in large format at SPIE Optics + Photonics in 2015, only print-quality digital files will be considered. Files smaller than 5 MB will not be accepted.

Complete information on the contest and rules is at www.spie.org/IYL.

How do you see light or light-based technologies being used in your daily life? Send in your photos.

Looking for inspiration? Take a tour of the gallery of gorgeous images from space presented by astronomer and science educator Ryan Hannahoe.

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