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Wanted: photonics ambassadors

Being an ambassador for the
International Year of Light
is easy -- and we hear that
it's fun as well.
Solving the challenges of the 21st century will depend as much on photonics as the 20th century's solutions depended on electronics.

Particles of light are the key ingredients for science and technology, from smartphones to medical imaging to synchrotrons. The United Nations’ International Year of Light initiative will show the world how optical and photonic technologies are vital to their futures and development of the whole society.

Some very big names have already gotten behind the initiative, and will be investing much time and considerable money in the effort. In addition to several professional societies who are Founding Partners, two companies and a professional society have signed on as Patrons, and a very long list of companies, research institutes, publications, universities, and associations are giving their support as well.

Even the Duke of York is getting involved, having declared his support as Patron in the UK.

And you, too, can be an ambassador for the International Year of Light! Here are a few ideas:

Nice IYL tie --
how can I get one?
  • Get your organization involved: Create an exhibit using a gallery of dazzling images displaying examples of the myriad wonderful things that light can do, and how it plays a critical role in our lives every day.
  • Give a presentation to a service group, classroom, youth group, or peer group, using a ready-built slide deck – and top it off with eight minutes of “terror” via the short video, “A Day without Photonics: a Modern Horror Story.”
  • Wear an IYL t-shirt, tie, or scarf. They’re not only attractive, but they'll help you tell the photonics story as well, by sparking conversation about why and how light plays such important roles in our lives.
  • Download the IYL bookmark and give one to all of the people in your life who read print-on-paper books – and drop off a supply at your local library or bookstore.
  • Print out an IYL poster for your workplace, dorm room, or classroom.

There are many other materials and resources available at www.spie.org/iyl to help you start your new ambassadorship – have fun! and keep it light ….

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