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‘People’s Choice’ highlights: Light illuminating spirits, minds, and hearts in every culture



People often like to separate culture, art, photonics, and optics as completely separate fields. However, when we combine the four fields we can capture beauty that seems so surreal. Light plays a vital role accentuating hidden beauties, illuminating spirits, minds, and hearts in every culture.

The advancements made in modern light technology has made it possible to highlight architecture, people, and objects. In the photo above John Danrev Bolus, has captured a “Night of Reflections” at the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque.

Bolus is one of 32 contestants for the People’s Choice Award competition in the SPIE International Year of Light Photo Contest. Judges have already chosen three winners, but now it's your turn to choose one more. SPIE is providing a prize of US $500 to the People's Choice winner. Online voting continues through 15 August.

Bolus is very passionate about his work and is proud to be representing his home country, the Philippines, as a finalist for the People's Choice Award.

Three other People’s choice finalist were able to use light to illustrate light illuminating spirits, minds, and hearts.


"Amiens Cathedral", by Spencer Cox, Amiens, France, 26 November 2013
Afternoon on the River, by Viễn Đông Phan (Vietnam), Ca Ty River, Phan Thiet, Vietnam, 13 January 2013.
 

"Transfer of Wisdom, Culture and Heritage", by Mario Cardenas, ve in Al Ain, UAE, 21 February 2014.


See more contestants' photos in previous posts in this series:



 

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