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Feeling the pinch of sequester? Take the survey, have your say



Scientists, researchers, and engineers attend conferences
(such as SPIE Advanced Lithography, above) to learn
about the latest research and industry developments,
network with others in the field, and locate
high-quality, right-cost vendors.
You know that scientific conferences are not junkets and that cutting national investments in technology R&D will cut national competitiveness in the global market. We hear it from every segment of photonics, and heard it particularly loud and clear at SPIE Defense, Security, and Sensing in Baltimore recently.

Now you have a new chance to join with others in getting the message out.

A survey has been opened to gather input from the scientific community about the impacts of the sequester.  We are passing along the invitation from Benjamin Corb, Director of Public Affairs at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, for you to take part and provide the photonics perspective in this cross-disciplinary effort.

Ben says:

"As science advocates continue to advocate for increases in federal investments in research – and against the sequester – we constantly hear from our meetings the need for stories and data on impacts of sequester.  In an effort to collect the data, the attached survey was developed to poll how individual scientists in the field are feeling the pinch not only of sequester, but also the impact shrinking budgets have had on the enterprise over the past few years.


"Once data is collected, we will convert the results into a usable report with statistics and hopefully anecdotal stories told by respondents."

We hope you’ll take part in the survey, and are looking forward to see the results. Comments are welcome here, as well.

And if you didn’t catch our “no junket” post on 12 April featuring testimony to Congress on the topic from Scientist and U.S. Congressman Rush Holt of New Jersey, here’s the link: Scientific conferences promote advances that grow the economy, save money, and improve lives.

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